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The WPHP Monthly Mercury is the podcast of The Women's Print History Project, a digital bibliographical database that recovers and discovers women’s print history for the eighteenth- and nineteenth-centuries (womensprinthistoryproject.com). Inspired by the titles of periodicals of the period, the WPHP Monthly Mercury dives into the gritty and gorgeous details of investigating women’s work as authors and labourers in the book trades.
 
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We put themed music at the end of each episode - "dessert," if you will. In the spirit of this holiday season, where we give ourselves the joy of eating dessert first, we'd like to highlight the artists whose work has enhanced ours over the past few years . See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art…
 
Why hasn’t the third edition of Hannah More’s Coelebs in Search of a Wife been digitized? Why doesn’t GoogleBooks group the different volumes of multi-volume works together in a single catalogue record? And, what do authors and pandas have in common? We bemoan the limitations of our various sources on a monthly basis, but this month we’re digging i…
 
Fannie Farmer was written off by society at an early age due to her disability. She rallied as an adult and parlayed her talent in the kitchen into a spectacular culinary career, becoming a beloved household name in the process. See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my…
 
In last October's episode, “Of Monks and Mountains!!!” Kate and Kandice each read a gothic novel found in the WPHP, and it was so much fun that we simply had to do it again. For Season 2, Episode 5, “The Witching Hour”, we read books about witches — almost every book that mentions witches in the title in the WPHP, in fact! (There are only five.) Bu…
 
Sarah Bernhardt began her life in France as the unwanted child of a heartless courtesan. She found her first true home in the theater; and through hard work, sheer luck, shocking eccentricity and her indomitable spirit, she transformed herself into the first A-list international celebrity the world had ever seen. See Privacy Policy at https://art19…
 
The worldwide eradication of smallpox was not Lady Mary Wortley Montagu's only claim to fame; she discarded the life she knew and set out to remake herself, acquiring a reputation for eccentricity, adventures worthy of a modern motion picture, and unwanted literary superstardom. See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy…
 
In 1794, Ann Lemoine’s husband, Henry, who was an author and publisher, went to debtor’s prison—this led to their separation, and the following year, Ann Lemoine began her own publishing business in White Rose Court in London. Between 1795 and the early 1820s, it is estimated that Ann Lemoine published, printed, and sold more than 400 titles, and e…
 
Lady Mary Wortley Montagu was brought up to believe that it was her face that was her fortune, and her place to be simply decorative. However, her uncommon intelligence, influence among the powerful, and her willingness to accept new ideas about medicine would save lives, help end smallpox, and transform the entire world. See Privacy Policy at http…
 
There are quite a few parallels between Mary Mallon's story (a series of typhoid outbreaks) and our present-day pandemic, and so there are things we can learn from it. But was Mary a villain? Or simply a victim of circumstances? See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my…
 
Throughout the month of August, we’ve been sharing Spotlights on the WPHP site as part of the “Around the World with Six Women” Spotlight Series on travel writing. In this month’s episode, hosts Kate Moffatt and Kandice Sharren are joined by the authors of the Spotlight Series, who share what they have learned during their vicarious journeys throug…
 
Olympias is known for being the mother of Alexander the Great and for being Very Fond Of Snakes. She was subject to centuries of slander by the historians who followed her - but in this episode, we right some of the wrongs, give you some context for her actions, and reveal her connection to the Olympic Games. See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com…
 
In 2016, Dr. Kirstyn Leuner shared data from her project, The Stainforth Library of Women’s Writing, with the WPHP — in particular, the Virtual International Authority Files she and her team had attached to their person records. This month, she joins us to chat all things Stainforth, databases, and cataloguing, including the kinds of data her team …
 
This year, the Statue of Liberty's Little Sister is coming to the US for a lengthy stay. The 9' reproduction travels first to New York for the Fourth of July, then to Washington for Bastille Day...and the next ten years. We thought that this was a good time to revisit the OG, the icon, the symbol of freedom for millions over the last 135 years: Lib…
 
Marjorie Merriweather Post was a natural philanthropist and organizer. Her fortune may have come to her by chance, and she is perhaps most famous for her outward signs of wealth, but she was no mere society butterfly. Rather than her extensive collection of jewels and artifacts, her true legacy is the multitude of people she was able to help with g…
 
Welcome back! In the first episode of Season 2 of The WPHP Monthly Mercury, hosts Kate Moffatt and Kandice Sharren delve into the publication history of Frances Burney’s first two (and most popular) novels, Evelina (1778) and Cecilia (1782). Although both were regularly reprinted well into the nineteenth century, we recently realised that the WPHP …
 
Marjorie Post was not *born* with a silver spoon in her mouth, but breakfast cereal sure provided her with one before her tenth birthday! She parlayed her father's company into a major food conglomerate, and lived like royalty as the Duchess of Washington DC and the Queen of Palm Beach. See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California…
 
She was many things: an actress, a dancer, a chemist, an artist, and a pioneer in stage lighting and choreography. She was inquisitive and energetic, full of creativity and drive. She was always looking for ways to help her friends and was the belle of Paris and the Art Nouveau movement...but she is best referred to as La Loïe, THE Loïe, one of a k…
 
For International Nurses Day, we're revisiting our coverage of Mary Seacole. While, technically, she wasn't a nurse, she was very much a brave medical caregiver, a "doctress," an entrepreneur, and one heck of a jam-maker who served those fighting at the front of the Crimean War (and so much more.) If you are interested in a more directly related nu…
 
In Part 3, Maya Angelou has stretched to fill many spheres of influence; she gathered accolades as she climbed and was generous with her experiences. Her lantern of wisdom shone all over the world, lighting the way ahead for others to follow. See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#…
 
Part 2 is a roller coaster! Maya Angelou faced some of her greatest challenges during this period of her life, and handled them all with the true grit we've come to expect of her. And then she triumphed in three separate spheres, one right after another; theater, journalism, and political activism. See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy an…
 
Throughout the twists and turns of her colorful life, Maya Angelou gathered the wisdom of the world and distilled it into a dynamic force with which to educate, to move, and to change society. Words have power! See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.…
 
In the final episode of Season One of The WPHP Monthly Mercury, hosts Kate Moffatt and Kandice Sharren celebrate Women’s History Month by interviewing Dr. Kate Ozment about the late seventeenth- and early eighteenth-century writer, Delarivier Manley. Famous for her scandalous semi-autobiographical ‘secret histories,’ which satirized important Whigs…
 
Greg Young and Tom Meyers, of The Bowery Boys New York City History podcast, share their 2020 coverage of early 1900s women's protests that were tied to the tragic Triangle Shirtwaist Factory Fire. See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.…
 
Calamity Jane, Belle Starr, and Annie Chambers were contemporaries of our previous subjects, the Harvey Girls and Fred Harvey, but they led very...very different lives. We've combined three stories from our archives into one Women of the Wild West episode. See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art1…
 
The Harvey Girls were not "just waitresses," they were adventuring, trailblazing, refined young women who helped settle the American West. And the story of these brave and hardworking women can't be told without discussing the man behind them: Fred Harvey. See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art1…
 
In Episode 9, “Bluestockings in Print,” hosts Kate Moffatt and Kandice Sharren are joined by Dr. Betty Schellenberg, Bluestocking expert, to talk about the learned ladies of the informal eighteenth-century society and their complex relationships with print — along with some musings about puddings, friendships, and dirty laundry. Put on your blue st…
 
From a rough start on the streets of Harlem, to the Apollo stage, smokey clubs, years on the road and in recording studios Ella led the world through the trends and wild ride that was the musical scene during most of the last century. See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-s…
 
Ramble. Ambulate. Wander. What are the words you use for walking? In our eighth episode, we’re looking to the words that women used to describe walking in print and manuscript during the eighteenth and early-nineteenth centuries, when a surge in pedestrian activity for leisure and pleasure occurred. An interview with guest Dr. Kerri Andrews, author…
 
Ten years ago, we met (literally MET!) to record our first episode. It's been a journey, and we thought as a milestone birthday celebration, we would ask listeners what The History Chicks have meant to you. Thank you so very much for the years of friendship. (sings) AND MANY MORE..... See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California P…
 
Once upon a time, there was a little moppet whose grit and optimism on screen gave the world the courage to endure the Great Depression. But time and fashion are fickle mistresses, and Shirley Temple had to reinvent herself as a star performer - in the world of diplomacy. See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice…
 
As 2020 draws to a tumultuous close, join hosts Kate Moffatt and Kandice Sharren as they look back—all the way to 1816. Often remembered as the cold and fog-laden year in which an 18-year-old Mary Shelley came up with the idea for Frankenstein, 1816 was a year of catastrophe more generally, known colloquially as “The Year Without a Summer” or “Eigh…
 
Charlotte didn't let her circumstances and the discouragement of others stand in the way of her goal of becoming a published author; she got knocked down over and over before she was able to present the world with one of the most beloved heroines in literary history. Along the way, we have a chance to talk about the lives of her literary sisters: E…
 
Have you ever wondered, “Where does all the WPHP data come from?” Well, look no further than this month’s episode of The WPHP Monthly Mercury! From missing Frances Burney and Ann Radcliffe editions to ESTC imprint-specific searches, our sixth episode identifies data gaps and explores our superstar resources, the wide variety of print and digital so…
 
After her creator died, Wonder Woman strayed quite a bit from where she began. She had her wings clipped by the censors in the 1950s, and lost her powers entirely in the 1960s. It took Gloria Steinem, Ms. Magazine, and the 1970s to bring Wonder Woman back to her feminist roots. See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy …
 
She was forged in the fires of the suffragist movement, and beneath her abbreviated costume beats the heart of a lion. Fighting for truth, equality, and justice, "By the Spear of Athena and the Thunderbolts of Jove!" - it's Wonder Woman! See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-no…
 
What do two of our favourite Gothic titles from the WPHP have in common? Banditti, the name ‘Clementina,’ and abducted women, for a start! Join hosts Kate and Kandice for this Halloween-themed episode of The WPHP Monthly Mercury as they discuss how you can identify works that align with the ‘gothic’ mode in the WPHP, chat about little-known women a…
 
We finish up our two-part series on women who ran for the US presidency in days gone by. Belva Lockwood ran in 1884 and 1888, and Shirley Chisholm threw her hat into the POTUS ring in the 1972 election. Neither candidate won the office, but they were both victorious at shattering glass ceilings to make room for women to come. Remastered from 2016. …
 
Here in the US, voting for the 2020 Presidential election has begun so we're revisiting the life of the very first woman to run for the American Presidency in 1872. Victoria Woodhull crafted a life for herself from very raw materials, she traveled from an abusive childhood to an aristocratic end and, throughout it all, was a woman ahead of her time…
 
In the fourth episode of The WPHP Monthly Mercury, “A Bibliographical Education”, hosts Kandice Sharren and Kate Moffatt wander through the works categorized as “Education” in the WPHP, exploring its variety of formats and styles, as well as its many adjacent genres—not least of which is the considerable “Juvenile Literature” genre, which past RA R…
 
Once upon a time in the dark ages of podcasting, two friends set out on a quest to bring the stories of historical women to your ears. In this episode, we have some speculative history, a few predictions about the future, and a peek behind the curtain in this, our tenth year! Thanks for listening! See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and…
 
In part 2 of our coverage, Empress Sisi helps to change the political climate in Hungary, experiences great personal tragedy, comes a little bit loose at the seams... and gained headlines with an ending that shook the world. See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-inf…
 
In this double episode of The WPHP Monthly Mercury, "Black Women and Female Abolitionists in Print," hosts Kandice Sharren and Kate Moffatt are joined by the entire team of the WPHP to speak to the Black Women’s and Abolition Print History Spotlight Series that we published on the WPHP site between June 19th and July 31st in response to the Black L…
 
Sisi was a shy young noblewoman who was plucked from obscurity and shoved onto the world stage with very little warning. She found the limelight a difficult place in which to live, but her beauty and her genuine concern for the common people earned her the status of a reluctant icon. Sisi's ultimate death shocked the whole world. See Privacy Policy…
 
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