Jamie Jeffers 公开
[search 0]
更多

Download the App!

show episodes
 
Loading …
show series
 
After fifteen months and 46 episodes, Unprecedential is packing up and going to the beach. Today’s episode features Adam and Elayne reflecting on their favorite conversations thus far. They also draw out some general lessons about constitutional governance from the wide-ranging insights brought by guests. In the meantime, watch out for bonus episod…
 
The Bill of Rights provides a great number of protections for accused and convicted criminals: it promises trial by jury; it prohibits “cruel and unusual” punishment. And in this system, defendants are presumed innocent until proven guilty. Yet few criminal indictments today are actually decided by a full trial; instead, prosecutors have many point…
 
From today’s vantage point, the Founding era often seems a time churning with decisive hopefulness. The 1789 Constitutional Convention certainly featured vehement debate, as Gary Schmitt and Joseph Bessette noted in our last episode. But optimism appeared to prevail: on the last day of the Convention, Benjamin Franklin concluded that a rising, rath…
 
When the Constitutional Convention began in 1787, delegates were tasked with creating a government that could simultaneously avoid monarchy’s overreaches and the Articles of Confederation’s ineffectiveness. In other words, the Convention needed to craft a republican executive. The Convention’s arguments over presidential selection, structure, and s…
 
Since the 19th Amendment ratified women’s right to vote in 1920, the quest for women’s equality in America has taken many turns. But the philosophical lineage behind the legal and cultural debates about women’s rights remains visible in today’s disagreements. Intellectual descendants of John Stuart Mill argue that reproductive autonomy best achieve…
 
Both historically and constitutionally, the freedom to worship has been a centerpiece of American politics. For much of their history, Americans viewed religious devotion as a linchpin of human experience and deserving of legal protection. But traditional religion has become increasingly suspect in the current cultural landscape, which prizes auton…
 
The relationship between politics and religion is inevitably fraught. In the American context, various confessions have evaluated America’s political arrangement differently over time, but some themes of the debate remain the same. Does America’s constitutional character favor religious belief? Or does it imply an anthropology of autonomous individ…
 
Higher education is supposed to provide space for citizens to generate new ideas, consider old ones, and debate about society’s priorities. But these intellectual activities depend upon open channels of dialogue, which face profound challenges from politically sensitive administrators and students driven by activism. What legal protections can stud…
 
The pandemic has dramatically emphasized the authority that scientific expertise commands in our political culture. As the CDC has periodically updated its guidelines over the course of the year, states, localities, and businesses adapted their policies in light of the new findings. The mantra of covid-19 has been “follow the science,” as though so…
 
As Ivana Stradner and Gary Schmitt noted in Unprecedential’s previous episode, the United States maintains many political, economic, and cultural interests abroad. One of the United States’ most crucial efforts abroad is the dissemination of unflinching, factual reporting in foreign nations without a free press of their own, which is the aim of Rad…
 
: After WWII, the United States led the world in building international institutions. But in recent decades America’s polarized politics has led to a bipolar approach to international institutions: years of significant distrust followed by years of significant deference. As the Biden Administration begins to engage international institutions, how s…
 
Our national legislature is overwhelmed. With a new presidential administration comes new appointments to confirm and a fresh legislative agenda to consider. But Congress’ time and resources are scarce. Antiquated legislative procedures have created perverse partisan incentives and handicapped Congress’ ability to perform its basic functions. What …
 
While presidential terms last four years, the first hundred days define much of posterity’s judgment of presidents. Franklin Roosevelt marked the one hundredth day of his term with a reflection about creating the New Deal, much of which he had assembled and executed in that short period of time. Presidents since have viewed the hundred-day window a…
 
With President Biden’s victory and two Senate seats in Georgia turning blue, Democrats will enjoy unified government control for at least two years. However, unified government does not necessarily mean President Biden can seamlessly push his legislative agenda through Congress. House and Senate Democrats represent diverse interests and priorities …
 
Aristotle defines rhetoric as the faculty for discovering the available means of persuasion in any given case. When George Washington was elected to be our first president, he used rhetoric not just in his inaugural address, but throughout the journey from his Mount Vernon home to New York's Federal Hall. He carefully selected his words and actions…
 
The president’s inaugural address exemplifies America’s republican constitution. It serves as the point of connection between the “poetry” of campaigns and the “prose” of governance. It embodies the peaceful transition of power, usually with the outgoing president present for the occasion. It comes weeks after the election’s other candidate concede…
 
In today’s era of modern governance, presidential transitions seems like a herculean task. The shift from a presidential campaign to a presidency requires preparing the president and his advisors for the responsibility of handling current crises; translating campaign policy proposals into actual legislation and agency actions; and identifying count…
 
2020 has shown us that our world has a lot of room for improvement, to say the least. But there’s also a lot to be grateful for. We’ve inherited an extraordinary constitutional system that has withstood the turmoil of 2020. This system’s wise and prudent stewards – such as George Washington, Abraham Lincoln, and Frederick Douglass – demonstrated re…
 
Since the days of John Marshall, justices have worn black robes to downplay their individuality. But in recent decades, Supreme Court justices have found themselves increasingly surrounded by a "celebrity culture" befitting politicians—or reality TV stars. If the exemplar of this trend was Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg (or "RBG" to her fans), then it…
 
It’s commonly noted that, in the wake of King George III’s manifold mishaps, America’s framers built a constitutional system designed to constrain the executive. After all, the Founders typically deemed Congress, not the Presidency, the most powerful branch thanks to the preeminence of legislative authority granted in the Constitution. So how is it…
 
Supreme Court reporters are tasked with the heavy responsibility of telling the Court’s story fairly and accurately. But this job is not as straightforward as it might seem. The Court decides complicated legal issues, and analysts must resist the temptation to treat the Court's work as simply political, or to suggest that the 5-4 rulings are the mo…
 
Technology has always played a role in global affairs, encouraging trade, cooperation, and competition among nations. Today’s tech giants, however, are not just influential bystanders in the international arena. They have become peers to global political powers, sometimes going toe-to-toe with state actors. Digital technology, software engineering,…
 
It is difficult to exaggerate Justice Antonin Scalia’s outsized impact on American constitutional law. Originalism and textualism, the interpretive methods he championed throughout his career, are key themes in today’s legal landscape thanks in large part to his elegant and witty defense of their merits. In this episode of Unprecedential, two forme…
 
Americans are all too aware of the partisan warfare involved in recent nominations to the Supreme Court. Heated political frenzy accompanied Brett Kavanaugh, Merrick Garland, and Neil Gorsuch on their path to reaching (or being denied) a seat on the nation’s highest bench. How much further will the Supreme Court nomination battles escalate? How did…
 
Every presidential election involves at least some uncertainty. But usually the uncertainty is the outcome—not the process itself. In 2020, however, with COVID-19 complicating every aspect of our lives, there is great uncertainty around how the basic processes of casting and counting votes will work. Will polling places be staffed? Will significant…
 
Since the election of Donald Trump, Americans have been sharply divided in their views of his presidency. Has he preserved the Founding Fathers’ vision of an energetic executive? Or has President Trump, in his quest for executive efficiency, sidestepped crucial constitutional constraints? This episode presents John Yoo and Adam White’s conversation…
 
When George Washington’s Administration proposed to create a national bank, it exploded divisions among Americans—and, more specifically, among Alexander Hamilton and James Madison—about what our Constitution means. The Bank, and the arguments surrounding it, continue to echo today. To discuss the Bank of the United States, Adam was joined on the p…
 
The Supreme Court, entrusted by the Constitution with “the judicial power,” is said to wield “neither force, nor will, but merely judgment.” To that end, the Constitution gives judges significant independence from political reprisal. Yet the institution as a whole remains part of our political system. The justices are appointed by politicians. Even…
 
For the 200th anniversary of the Supreme Court’s landmark decision in McCulloch v. Maryland, AEI’s Program on American Citizenship commissioned six distinguished scholars to author essays related to that decision. Gary Schmitt, the editor of the volume, provides an introduction with his essay, “John Marshall and the Politics of McCulloch v. Marylan…
 
In Federalist 37, James Madison conceded that even the best lawmakers cannot write perfectly clear laws. “All written laws,” whether the Constitution or in statutes, “are considered as more or less obscure and equivocal, until their meaning be liquidated and ascertained by a series of particular discussions and adjudications”. These discussions hap…
 
Some of America’s most important precedents are the ones that were set outside of the Supreme Court. So much of the form and function of American public life reflects precedents set by the founding generation, by the first Congress and the first president. And among President Washington’s most significant precedents was his establishment of the […]…
 
In moments of disaster, the White House is the first to respond. AEI's Kori Schake and Ryan Streeter join Adam to discuss how that response is coordinated. The post Defense Coordinators — How the White House Manages Disaster appeared first on American Enterprise Institute - AEI.由American Enterprise Institute
 
For nearly 100 years the Supreme Court has declined to strike down laws that it believes “delegates” Congress’s legislative power to the Executive Branch. What would a more assertive “nondelegation doctrine” look like? Until then, what limits — if any — does the current nondelegation doctrine place upon Congress? Administrative Law nerds everywhere…
 
Loading …

快速参考指南

Google login Twitter login Classic login