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The Flame tells the story of two women: Jamie (Ellie Brigida), an LGBTQ bar owner, and Sam (Jasmin Savoy Brown), the woman selling the building the bar inhabits, and the inevitable sparks that end up flying between them! With the help of her best friend, Heather (Leigh Holmes Foster), and bar regular Jo (Jenn Colella), can the residents of The Flame keep the bar alive? Or can Sam’s friend Mel (Valerie Rose Lohman) help her work through her complicated feelings about her father’s death and th ...
 
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Liang Luo's book The Global White Snake (U Michigan Press, 2021) examines the Chinese White Snake legends and their extensive, multidirectional travels within Asia and across the globe. Such travels across linguistic and cultural boundaries have generated distinctive traditions as the White Snake has been reinvented in the Chinese, Japanese, Korean…
 
As in colonial situations elsewhere, Korean experiences of Japanese empire featured many attempts by the imperial authorities to regulate intimate aspects of Korean life, including intermarriage between colonizer and colonized peoples. While official messaging and policy promoted Korean-Japanese unions, cultural output including films, short storie…
 
It’s a cliche to call North Korea the most isolated country in the world. Those of us living outside the country often have very little idea of what life there is like, often only seeing what its government would like us to see: military parades, missile launches, and joyous crowds. Yet Lindsey Miller, author of North Korea: Like Nowhere Else: Two …
 
Speaking in tongues, also known as glossolalia, has long been a subject of curiosity as well as vigorous theological debate. A worldwide phenomenon that spans multiple Christian traditions, glossolalia is both celebrated as a supernatural gift and condemned as semiotic alchemy. For some it is mystical speech that exceeds what words can do, and for …
 
The US military camptowns were established shortly after the Second World War in 1945, appropriating the Japanese comfort stations. The Korean government actively supported the creation of camptowns for its own economic and national security interests. Utilizing the Japanese colonial policy, the US military and the South Korean government sought to…
 
Previously on the Flame: Rachel (Chilina Kennedy) wants Jamie back and she'll stop at nothing to get what she wants. Harold (Jesse Nowack) brings Sam (Jasmin Savoy Brown) to dinner to negotiate the contract and make sure she sees Jamie (Ellie Brigida) on a "date" with Rachel. Sounds like a disaster in the making! And Mel (Valerie Rose Lohman) and J…
 
Previously on the Flame: Sam (Jasmin Savoy Brown) and Jamie (Ellie Brigida) go on the world's cutest ice cream date and Jamie gets some digits! But things get tense when Harold (Jesse Nowack) shows up to check on "his" property and he won't let a little sapphic romance get in the way of his steal of the century. And Rachel (Chilina Kennedy), shows …
 
Previously on the Flame: Jamie (Ellie Brigida) and Sam (Jasmin Savoy Brown) got all cute on us in the jail cell and finally kissed! Jo (Jenn Collela), Mel (Valerie Rose Lohman) and Heather (Leigh Holmes Foster) bond over a "Car Ride From Hell" on the way to pick up Sam and Jamie. This week on the Flame, Sam (Jasmin Savoy Brown) and Jamie (Ellie Bri…
 
Previously on the Flame: Jamie (Ellie Brigida) and Sam (Jasmin Savoy Brown) confront each other, get arrested and put in the same jail cell. This week on the Flame, Sam (Jasmin Savoy Brown) and Jamie (Ellie Brigida) spend some quality time together discussing astrology, daddy issues and getting cozy. And talk about a tight fit! Jo (Jenn Collela), M…
 
Previously on the Flame: Jo (Jenn Colella) and the patrons of the Flame are ready to fight! This week on the Flame, Sam (Jasmin Savoy Brown) and Mel (Valerie Rose Lohman) are heading to the bar to offer to sell the bar to Jamie so that the Patrons of the Flame don't have to leave their space, but she's greeted by Jamie (Ellie Brigida), Jo (Jenn Col…
 
Previously on the Flame: Mel and Jo reconnect and Sam starts to deal with some Daddy Issues This week on the Flame, Jamie (Ellie Brigida) is having one of her famous dumpster cries and double fisting Slurpees, Heather (Leigh Holmes Foster) cheers her up with a song "You've Got Me" and Jo (Jenn Collela) is rallying the patrons of the Flame to fight!…
 
Previously on the Flame: Jamie and the Patrons of the Flame are getting evicted! This week, everyone is freaking out! Jamie (Ellie Brigida) is having a full on melt down in the back office and that Goop is not looking too good the second time around, Heather (Leigh Holmes Foster) is doing everything she can to take care of her best friend and Sam (…
 
Jamie (Ellie Brigida), the owner of the Flame, everyone's favorite LGBTQ bar, is having a rough day. It's the anniversary of when her proposal was rejected by her ex-girlfriend Rachel (Chilina Kennedy) and all she wants to do is marathon Buffy Season Six. But her best friend Heather (Leigh Holmes Foster) and the patrons of the Flame are always ther…
 
Being arguably each side’s most enduring international bond, the China-Korea relationship has long been of great practical and symbolic importance to both. Moreover, as Odd Arne Westad observes in his new book, this has in many ways also been a paradigmatic kind of tie between a large ‘empire’ and smaller (though by no means small) ‘nation’, and th…
 
Dr. Kristen Looney’s Mobilizing for Development: The Modernization of Rural East Asia published by Cornell University in 2020 interrogates how countries achieve rural development and offers a new way of thinking about East Asia's political economy that challenges the developmental state paradigm. Based on archival research and fieldwork in Asia, th…
 
The cultural landscape plays a momentous role in the transmission of Christianity. Consequently, the global expansion of the church has led to the increasing diversification of world Christianity. As a result, scholars are turning more and more to native cultures as the point of focus. Understanding Korean Christianity: Grassroot Perspectives on Ca…
 
Known for a tradition of Confucian filial piety, East Asian societies have some of the oldest and most rapidly aging populations on earth. Today these societies are experiencing unprecedented social challenges to the filial tradition of adult children caring for aging parents at home. Marshalling mixed methods data, Beyond Filial Piety: Rethinking …
 
Eika Tai’s Comfort Women Activism: Critical Voices from the Perpetrator State (Hong Kong University Press, 2020) tackles the complex histories of Japanese “military sexual violence” and the activism by women in Japan, mostly since the 1990s. Tai’s contribution to scholarship on the so-called “comfort women” issue begins with a helpful overview of b…
 
Is the Indo-Pacific already the most dominant in terms of global power, politics, and wealth? In his newest book, Michael R. Auslin considers the key issues facing the Indo-Pacific which have ramifications for the entire world. Geopolitical competition in the region threatens stability not just in Asia, but globally. In a series of essays, Asia's N…
 
What happens to everyday-life in a city when it becomes subsumed into an empire? Who becomes responsible for the everyday building and management of the new imperial enclave? How do local residents and colonial settlers manage to live side-by-side in new imperial arrangements? In Constructing Empire: The Japanese in Changchun, 1905-45 (University o…
 
As well as presenting practical challenges, addressing the question ‘what is it like in North Korea?’ raises ethical concerns around who is entitled to interpret life in a place so often discussed in luridly exoticizing terms. The awareness of authorial position and sensitivity to shared humanity which runs through Andray Abrahamian’s Being in Nort…
 
Intertwining autobiography and ethnography, Clara Han’s touching new book Seeing Like a Child: Inheriting the Korean War (Fordham University Press, 2020) asks how scholarship can be transformed from a child’s perspective. Through a critique of anthropological practices that assume fully formed “I” in its emphasis on self-reflexivity as well as the …
 
Money Games: The Inside Story of How American Dealmakers Saved Korea’s Most Iconic Bank (Wiley, 2020) by Weijian Shan’s, is a riveting tale of one of the most successful buyout deals ever: the acquisition and turnaround of what used to be Korea’s largest bank by the American firm Newbridge Capital. Full of intrigue and suspense, this insider's acco…
 
Welcome to The Flame, premiering in June 2021! We wanted to give you all a sneak peek of what's coming your way here at the Flame. Here's a preview of Maybe Today, sung by Jamie (Ellie Brigida), our hopelessly romantic protagonist. With the support of over 300 Pinkstart backers, we were able to pay for the entire production of this song including l…
 
David Fedman's Seeds of Control: Seeds of Control: Japan’s Empire of Forestry in Colonial Korea (University of Washington Press, 2020) is hard to categorize. In a good way. Put simply, it is a broad but sharp look at the history of Japanese forest management in the Korean peninsula, 1910-1945. In this sense, Fedman’s book is an environmental histor…
 
How vulnerable can you be as a researcher? Why, in a commercially successful city like Wangqing, are Chinese Koreans more successful in their businesses than entrepreneurs from Korea who often have prestigious educational degrees? These are some of the questions Sharon Yoon addresses in her powerful new book, The Cost of Belonging: An Ethnography o…
 
In a bustling city-center of Seoul, women in yellow vests protesting over the “final” resettlement between the Japanese and Korean governments every Wednesday is an iconic sight, testifying to the strength and resilience of the “comfort women” movement. In her award-winning book Embodied Reckonings: “Comfort Women,” Performance, and Transpacific Re…
 
Shinra Myojin and Buddhist Networks of the East Asian “Mediterranean” (University of Hawaii Press, 2020) is a fascinating study of the transcultural underpinnings of Medieval East Asian Buddhist traditions with an emphasis on Shinra Myōjin, a deity integral to the institutional development of the Medieval Japanese Tendai faction, the Jimon. It demo…
 
Studies on marriage migration often portray marriage migrants as victims of globalization and patriarchy. Although there are intersecting oppressions among female migrant workers, the tendency to conflate marriage migration with sex trafficking among humanitarian organizations and scholars lead to erasure of divergent experiences. In her book, Elus…
 
From the Mountains to the Cities A History of Buddhist Propagation in Korea (University of Hawaii Press, 2018), written by Mark A. Nathan, is a history of P’ogyo (Buddhist Propagation) on the Korean peninsula from the late 19th century to the beginning of the 21st that switches its focus to... Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/ad…
 
Though traditionally regarded as a monarch who failed to arrest the gradual decline of his kingdom, the Korean king Chŏngjo has benefited in recent decades from a wave of new scholarship which has reassessed both his reign and his role in Korean history. The latest to do so is Christopher... Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adch…
 
“The things that are happening to North Korea are happening to all of us…they are part of the human community. To say that this is just a problem for North Korea is to say that North Koreans are not part of the human community.” In her new book, Dying for... Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming…
 
Why does Korean cultural policy matter? In Cultural Policy in South Korea: Making a New Patron State (Routledge, 2018), Hye-Kyung Lee, a Senior Lecturer in Cultural and Creative Industries at Kings College, London, demonstrates the importance of South Korea is both an example in comparative cultural policy, and as a fascinating... Learn more about …
 
The fact that Korea’s experience of Japanese imperialism plays a role in present-day Japan-Korea relations is no secret to anyone. Questions of guilt, responsibility and atonement continue to bubble below, and occasionally break through, the surface of ties between two countries which otherwise have much in common culturally and in... Learn more ab…
 
With recent events having raised hopes that significant change may be afoot in North Korea, it is important to remember that DPRK society has in fact been undergoing steady transformation for a considerable period of time. Among the most important dimensions of this are the changes that have occurred in... Learn more about your ad choices. Visit me…
 
At an often-stressful time in global affairs, and with the very idea of the ‘international community’ seemingly under threat, it can be beneficial to look at the ‘global order’ from its disorderly fringes. Andray Abrahamian’s North Korea and Myanmar: Divergent Paths (McFarland, 2018) does precisely this, comparing and contrasting North... Learn mor…
 
Amidst an atmosphere of hope on the Korean Peninsula over the past year, questions over the wellbeing of North Korea’s population have again come to global attention. But this is far from the first time that such a subject has been in the news, for ever since the catastrophic famine... Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices …
 
Shortly after the introduction of Catholicism into Korea in the late 18th century, Korea’s Confucian government began to persecute Catholics. Why would a Confucian government torture and kill the people it was supposed to protect and nurture? Why would Koreans turn to a religion that differed fundamentally from the established... Learn more about y…
 
The inspiration for Robert S. Boynton‘s new book began with a photograph in the New York Times in October 2002. In the photo, two middle-aged Japanese couples and a single woman descending from a plane at Tokyo’s Haneda Airport. The headline read, “Tears and Hugs as 5 Abducted Japanese Go... Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adch…
 
Christians, like other religious people, have to manage the relationship between their belief in supernatural forces and an afterlife on one side, and how those beliefs impact their daily life on the other. This was especially difficult for Korean Protestant Christians (and members of an indigenous religion influenced by Christianity... Learn more …
 
Byonghyon Choi‘s new book makes a key document of Korean and world history available in English in a volume that will be tremendously useful for both scholarship and teaching. The Annals of King T’aejo: Founder of Korea’s Choson Dynasty (Harvard University Press, 2014) translates an important excerpt from The Veritable... Learn more about your ad c…
 
Eugene Y. Park‘s A Family of No Prominence: The Descendants of Pak Tokhwa and the Birth of Modern Korea (Stanford University Press, 2014) traces this history by focusing on the Miryang Pak family. The history of transformations in the family’s social status and geography parallels that of modern Korea, and... Learn more about your ad choices. Visit…
 
Todd Henry’s new book is a wonderful study of public space as a laboratory for producing the experiences and engines of colonial society. Assimilating Seoul: Japanese Rule and the Politics of Public Space in Colonial Korea, 1910-1945 (University of California Press, 2014) explores the forms of spatialization of colonial KeijÅ�... Learn more about y…
 
In Songs of Seoul: An Ethnography of Voice and Voicing in Christian South Korea (University of California Press, 2013), Nicholas Harkness explores the human voice as an instrument, and object, and an emblem in a rich ethnography of songak in Christian South Korea. In Songs of Seoul, the voice is deeply embodied.... Learn more about your ad choices.…
 
In The Real Modern: Literary Modernism and the Crisis of Representation in Colonial Korea (Harvard University Asia Center, 2013), Christopher P. Hanscom explores literary modernism in the work of three writers who were central to literary production in 1930s Korea. After introducing a useful critique of the standard approach to... Learn more about …
 
For a patient choosing among available forms of healing in the medical marketplace of mid-20th century South Korea, the process was akin to shopping. In Reconstructing Bodies: Biomedicine, Health, and Nation-Building in South Korea Since 1945 (Stanford University Press, 2013), John DiMoia explores emergence of that marketplace in the context... Lea…
 
Early Korea is a resource like no other: in an ongoing series of volumes produced by the Early Korea Project at the Korea Institute of Harvard University, the series provides surveys of Korean scholarship on fundamental issues in the study of early Korean history, archaeology, and art history. The volumes, produced... Learn more about your ad choic…
 
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