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Latino USA is the foremost Latino voice in public media and the longest running Latino-focused program on radio. As the most consistent voice reporting on Latino news and culture since 1992, Futuro Media Group’s Latino USA (LUSA) brings depth of experience, on-the-ground connections and knowledge of current and emerging issues impacting Latinos and other people of color to every broadcast. Reporting stories about diversity, culture, civic dialogue and how people live (and struggle) with diff ...
 
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August 7, 2019 forever changed the lives of many immigrants in Mississippi. Almost 700 people were taken by ICE that day in the largest single state immigration raid in the country.Latino USA continues its reporting in Mississippi and heads back to the state to follow-up with some of the people we met in last year’s episode, After the Mississippi R…
 
Latino USA and Black Public Media bring you Alzheimer’s In Color. It’s the story of Ramona Latty, a Dominican immigrant, told by her daughter Yvonne, and it mirrors countless other families of color navigating a disease that is ravaging the Latino community. It’s been four years now since Ramona was diagnosed. Four years of the lonely journey, whic…
 
August 7th, 2019 was the day that tore apart an unlikely community of Guatemalan immigrants in central Mississippi. A year ago, hundreds of ICE agents arrived at seven chicken processing plants and arrested 680 workers. Many of them were fathers and mothers whose kids were left behind for days, weeks, or even months. Today, many families are still …
 
On March 14th of 2020, just as the governor of California issued a state-wide mandate for Californians to shelter in place, Martha Escudero and her two daughters became the first of a dozen unhoused families to occupy one of over a hundred vacant houses in El Sereno, Los Angeles. Some call them squatters, but they call themselves the Reclaimers bec…
 
Produced by Julieta Martinelli and Maria Hinojosa, and edited by Marlon Bishop. Field production by Fernanda Camarena and Benjamin Alfaro. Additional help by Isabella Cota, Janice Llamoca, Jeanne Montalvo, and Miguel Macias. Featured illustrations by Alexander Charner.The executive producer for this series is Diane Sylvester. The series was made po…
 
“The Moving Border” series was produced by Julieta Martinelli, Fernanda Camarena, and Maria Hinojosa, and edited by Marlon Bishop. The executive producer is Diane Sylvester. It was made possible by a partnership with the Pulitzer Center, with additional support provided by the Ford Foundation.Featured illustration by Alexander Charner.…
 
On May 3, 2017, a young woman named Lesvy Berlín Rivera Osorio was found dead on the campus of UNAM, the National Autonomous University of Mexico. The death was shocking for a few reasons: she had been found strangled with a payphone cord wound around her neck, and the campus of UNAM, a prestigious university with hundreds of thousands of students,…
 
After a fiery plane crash in 1948, all 32 people on-board died—but they weren't all treated the same same after death. Twenty-eight of the passengers were migrant Mexican workers and were buried in a mass grave. The other four were Americans and had their bodies returned to their families for proper burial. It took the work of a determined Mexican-…
 
Castulo Estrada grew up in Oasis, a mobile home community on the east side of Coachella. The way he describes it, Coachella is divided into two parts: the west side and the east side. On the west side, there are beautiful homes with large front and backyards. Fifteen percent of all golf courses in California are there, and it tends to be predominan…
 
Castulo Estrada grew up in Oasis, a mobile home community on the east side of Coachella. The way he describes it, Coachella is divided into two parts: the west side and the east side. On the west side, there are beautiful homes with large front and backyards. Fifteen percent of all golf courses in California are there, and it tends to be predominan…
 
Today, Atlanta is a cultural hub—a center for music, movies and TV shows. But that wasn’t always the case.Almost three decades ago, the mayor of Atlanta, Andrew Young, wanted to give his city a rebranding. After coming into the national spotlight during the Civil Rights Movement, the image of tense race relations in Atlanta was hard to shake.But fo…
 
Vicente Montalvo grew up in Echo Park, minutes away from Dodger Stadium in Los Angeles. Little did he know, his family had history that was buried underneath the stadium that opened its doors in 1962.His grandparents told him their story: how they grew up in the ’30s and ’40s in a community named Palo Verde, how they owned a home, and how happy the…
 
In 2016, 260 residents were killed from vehicle collisions in Los Angeles. That includes drivers, bikers and people walking. What’s more, car crashes are the No. 1 killer of children in all of L.A. The city is aware that its streets are dangerous and is currently looking to a policy from Sweden that was developed in the 1990s to help make their roa…
 
Part of our conversation with Chilean actor Pedro Pascal, who plays one of the Netflix series' main characters; Spanish actor Miguel Angel Silvestre, who plays a money launderer for the drug cartel; and Guatemala native Arturo Castro, who goes from playing the sweet gay best-friend in Broad City, to playing the son of a cartel bossman in this seaso…
 
The following segment is from a special two-part radio series which broadcast in July, 2016. NPR’s Latino USA investigates the unusual death of a man in an U.S. immigrant detention center, and what his death tells us about conditions —especially mental health services— inside the immigrant detention system. This investigation was reported with assi…
 
A 2016 segment from our sister podcast, In The Thick (inthethick.org)In this conversation, Maria Hinojosa leads a discussion about the almost unbelievably complex relationship between Puerto Rico and the US with guests Sandra Lilley, Managing Editor of NBC Latino, Natascha Otero, a leader of South Florida’s chapter of the National Puerto Rican Agen…
 
This month Puerto Ricans commemorated the centennial of the Jones Act, the first piece of legislation that gave Puerto Ricans a pathway to U.S. citizenship. Starting in 1917, people born in Puerto Rico, a territory of the U.S, were able to become American citizens through naturalization, and they did so for about 20 years."It's a complicated identi…
 
Twenty-one years after her death, Tejano singer and pop culture icon Selena Quintanilla Perez once again became immortalized. It all started when Patty Rodriguez launched an online petition over a year ago with a single mission: to get MAC Cosmetics to release a “Selena Quintanilla for MAC” limited edition collection. A few months and 38,000 signat…
 
A man dies in a U.S. immigration detention center, under unusual circumstances. He is found unresponsive in his cell, with a sock stuffed down his throat. His death is ruled a suicide, but little information is put out about what happened, and the family wants answers. In this first part of a special two-part series, Latino USA investigates why Jos…
 
In New Mexico during the 1960s, Reies López Tijerina transformed the issue of land rights into an issue of civil rights. He led a movement of Hispanos —people with Spanish, Mexican and Native American ancestry— who had lost their communal land to private landowners or government agencies and demanded it back. López Tijerina’s activism reached its p…
 
The Southwest was once a part of Mexico, but that doesn’t mean that Mexicans have always felt welcome there. Land disputes led to segregation, discrimination and even state-sanctioned violence. Latino USA looks into the history of resistance leaders like Juan Cortina and Reies López Tijerina, the dark side of the Texas Rangers and school segregatio…
 
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