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Listen in on accessible, fascinating conversations between Princeton researchers at the cutting-edge of their fields. It is produced by Isabel Rodrigues under the 145th Board of The Daily Princetonian in partnership with Princeton Insights, a team of Princeton graduate and postdoctoral researchers working to feature research in an accessible manner for peers across departments and the public alike.
 
The Princeton Pulse Podcast highlights the vital connections between health research and policy. Hosted by Heather Howard, professor at Princeton University and former New Jersey Commissioner of Health and Senior Services, the show brings together scholars, policymakers, and other leaders to discuss today’s most pressing health policy issues – domestically and globally. Guests discuss novel research at Princeton along with partnerships aimed at improving public health and reducing health dis ...
 
Our Sunday morning service uses multimedia, contemporary music and a message to convey the timeless truths of the Bible in a clear, relevant, and interesting way. Whether you are investigating Christianity for the first time or have been a believer for years, you will receive a blessing from our services.
 
The Princeton African American Studies Department is known as a convener of conversations about the political, economic, and cultural forces that shape our understanding of race and racial groups. We invite you to listen as faculty “read” how race and culture are produced globally, look past outcomes to origins, question dominant discourses, and consider evidence instead of myth.
 
I grew up in San Francisco in the 1970’s, and was able to watch the development of American weed culture before my very eyes. While marijuana has recently experienced a transformation into a fully regulated recreational market, I became disappointed by the lack of representation of my generation, the cultural erasure of the tens of thousands of older Americans who helped start the movement and utilize the substance on a daily basis to improve their lives. As I started seriously working on th ...
 
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show series
 
The inaugural episode of The Princeton Pulse Podcast addresses maternal and infant health disparities, a serious and often overlooked public health crisis. The facts are startling. In the United States, Black mothers are three to four times more likely to die of pregnancy-related complications than white women, and Black babies are twice as likely …
 
Head coach Bob Surace and senior LB Matthew Jester join host Cody Chrusciel on the Week 3 edition of the First in Football Podacast, recapping Princeton's win over Lehigh and previewing the 2022 Ivy League opener at Columbia. See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-in…
 
In Episode 26 of the Princeton Podcast, Mayor Mark Freda sat down with Dave Errickson, the Executive Director of Corner House Behavioral Health, a Princeton non-profit organization working to prevent and treat alcohol and drug addiction by engaging and supporting youth, adults, and families in life-long healthy living and recovery. In addition to r…
 
Internships are a staple of the business world, and a step almost mandatory for young people entering many areas of the workforce. But how many are full of busywork? How many are unpaid? Rob Khoury, who founded and runs his own consulting company, Agile Rainmakers, wants internships to reach their true potential, as fulfilling experiences that mutu…
 
Seminary ChapelJesus and Our Insatiable ThirstThe purpose of this brief series of homilies on the Woman at the Well is to help us move beyond thinking about Jesus’ encounter with a Samaritan woman who had a difficult time with relationships, to consider our own deep thirst for something more. This is striking because we’re supposed to know the Jesu…
 
How did superpower competition and the cold war affect writers in the decolonizing world? In The Aesthetic Cold War: Decolonization and Global Literature (Princeton UP, 2022), Peter Kalliney explores the various ways that rival states used cultural diplomacy and the political police to influence writers. In response, many writers from Africa, Asia,…
 
Bill Boyce continues on series on identity by preaching from 1 Peter 1:3-5 "Blessed be the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ! According to his great mercy, he has caused us to be born again to a living hope through the resurrection of Jesus Christ from the dead, to an inheritance that is imperishable, undefiled, and unfading, kept in heaven f…
 
In this special episode of The Highlights, we interview Chino Eke, an undergraduate senior in the Neuroscience department. We discuss his senior thesis research, which was done with his advisor Professor Elizabeth Gould, a professor and researcher in the Princeton Neuroscience department focused on brain plasticity. Chino’s paper investigates two t…
 
In 1346, a catastrophic plague beset Europe and its neighbours. The Black Death was a human tragedy that abruptly halved entire populations and caused untold suffering, but it also brought about a cultural and economic renewal on a scale never before witnessed. The World the Plague Made is a panoramic history of how the bubonic plague revolutionize…
 
In 1831, at the age of twenty-five, Alexis de Tocqueville made his fateful journey to America, where he observed the thrilling reality of a functioning democracy. From that moment onward, the French aristocrat would dedicate his life as a writer and politician to ending despotism in his country and bringing it into a new age. In this authoritative …
 
As we emerge from a period of government-mandated lockdowns and as threats to free speech multiply, we would be wise to re-engage with the work of a seminal thinker on the subjects of liberty, freedom and nondomination. We can do so most effectively by reading Completely Free: The Moral and Political Vision of John Stuart Mill (Princeton UP, 2022) …
 
In this section of scripture we see David stumbles, Joab, his general sees that this isn't a good idea for David to do a census. The point being that David wanted to puff himself up with numbering his army and population, not trusting in God and his might. Grab your bible and lets study together! www.RiverSideFWB.com…
 
Head Coach Bob Surace, Offensive Coordinator Mike Willis, and senior safety Mike Ruttlen Jr. join host Cody Chrusciel on the Week 1 edition of the First in Football Podcast as Princeton gets set to travel to Stetson to open the 2022 campaign. See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#…
 
In Episode 25 of the Princeton Podcast, Mayor Mark Freda sat down with Michael Russell, President of the Princeton Battlefield Society, a national non-profit organization that works to acquire, protect, preserve, and restore the lands and cultural landscape related to the Battle of Princeton of 1777. In addition to Princeton Battlefield Society’s w…
 
Seminary ChapelJesus and Our Insatiable ThirstThe purpose of this brief series of homilies on the Woman at the Well is to help us move beyond thinking about Jesus’ encounter with a Samaritan woman who had a difficult time with relationships, to consider our own deep thirst for something more. This is striking because we’re supposed to know the Jesu…
 
In The New Era in Mathematics, 1920-1950 (Princeton University Press, 2022) Karen Parshall explores the institutional, financial, social, and political forces that shaped and supported the American Mathematics community in the first half of the twentieth century. Drawing from extensive archival and primary-source research, Professor Parshall uncove…
 
Chris Sallade kicks off our first FNF of the new semester with our new series on identity. Chris teaches from Luke 9:23-25 "Then [Jesus] said to them all: 'Whoever wants to be my disciple must deny themselves and take up their cross daily and follow me. For whoever wants to save their life will lose it, but whoever loses their life for me will save…
 
Seminary Chapel | Opening Communion, Fall 2022Scripture: Joshua 4:1-7 Homily: “Remembering to Move Ahead”God told Joshua to create a monument of twelve stones taken from the Jordon River crossing to give the people a memory of God’s faithfulness. But the people had just entered the Promised Land, and all of the challenges of moving into it still la…
 
After its founding in 1540 by an aristocrat turned spiritualist turned intellectual, Ignatius of Loyola, the Society of Jesus—or the Jesuits—established itself as one of the most influential and successful of all religious orders. The Jesuits were important in doctrine, politics, missionary work and of course education. At times they have been out …
 
From social media posts and text messages to digital government documents and archives, researchers are bombarded with a deluge of text reflecting the social world. This textual data gives unprecedented insights into fundamental questions in the social sciences, humanities, and industry. Meanwhile new machine learning tools are rapidly transforming…
 
Margaret Cohen joins John to discuss The Underwater Eye, which explores "How the Movie Camera Opened the Depths and Unleashed New Realms of Fantasy." Margaret's earlier prizewinning books include The Novel and the Sea and The Sentimental Education of the Novel, but this project brings her places even her frequent surfing forays hadn't yet reached. …
 
In Episode 24 of the Princeton Podcast, Mayor Mark Freda sat down with Joyce Trotman-Jordan and Soorya Baliga, board members of Not In Our Town Princeton, a multi-racial, multi-faith group of individuals who stand together for racial justice and inclusive communities. Joyce and Soorya discussed their organization’s current events, including a serie…
 
Starting in the sixteenth century, Jews in Rome were forced, every Saturday, to attend a hostile sermon aimed at their conversion. Harshly policed, they were made to march en masse toward the sermon and sit through it, all the while scrutinized by local Christians, foreign visitors, and potential converts. In Catholic Spectacle and Rome's Jews: Ear…
 
In this section of scripture, John sitting in a jail cell, asks, "Jesus are you the one?" Have you ever doubted when you are in trouble that Jesus is who he claims to be? How do you deal with doubt? Grab your bible and lets build our faith in this episode of "At The River!" www.RiverSideFWB.com
 
Our guest "Mr. No Limits" teaches from 1 Samuel when David had to learn to encourage himself in the Lord! Grab your bible and lets study together! Don't forget to subscribe to No Limits' youtube channel, follow the link below! https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCRxVAi9F-pdChVIQmTGRdYg
 
Information is everywhere. We live in an “Information” Society. We can get more of it faster, quicker, and in more different shapes and sizes than at probably any other time in history. Meanwhile, misinformation (a very old word) and disinformation (a neologism of the 20th century) have worked their way into our collective cultural lexicon. Like ev…
 
A major poet, Paul Laurence Dunbar (1872-1906) was one of the first African American writers to garner international recognition in the wake of emancipation. In this definitive biography, the first full-scale life of Dunbar in half a century, Gene Andrew Jarrett offers a revelatory account of a writer whose Gilded Age celebrity as the "poet laureat…
 
In Episode 23 of the Princeton Podcast, Mayor Mark Freda sat down with Shirley Satterfield, Educator, Princeton Historian, and Founder of the Witherspoon-Jackson Historical and Cultural Society. In this episode, Shirley discussed her family’s 6-generation history here in Princeton, shared some experiences of her early education at the Witherspoon S…
 
Tom Szaky ’05 says everything we own eventually comes to the end of its lifespan, whether it’s a shirt you’ve worn for years or the cup from a coffee you bought this morning. Where does it all go? How much actually gets recycled? And with evidence mounting that all this waste is damaging our world, how can we throw on the brakes? Over the 20 years …
 
It’s the sixteenth century, and the Ottoman Empire has just defeated the Mamluk Sultanate, conquering Damascus and Cairo, important centers of Arab learning and culture. But how did these two groups–Arabs and “Rumis”, a term used to refer to those living in Anatolia, interact? How did Arabs deal with these powerful upstarts–and how did Rumis try to…
 
What a Mushroom Lives For: Matsutake and the Worlds They Make (Princeton University Press, 2022) by Dr. Michael Hathaway pushes today’s mushroom renaissance in compelling new directions. For centuries, Western science has promoted a human- and animal-centric framework of what counts as action, agency, movement, and behavior. But, as Michael Hathawa…
 
For the hermits and communal monks of antiquity, the desert was a place to flee the cacophony of ordinary life in order to hear and contemplate the voice of God. But these monks discovered something surprising in their harsh desert surroundings: far from empty and silent, the desert is richly reverberant. Sonorous Desert: What Deep Listening Taught…
 
June 16, 2022 | The Joe R. Engle Institute of PreachingClosing Worship: "A Name Only the Brave Can Say"Preacher: Rev. Dr. Janette Ok, associate professor of New Testament, Fuller Seminary; pastor, Ekko Church in Fullerton, CaliforniaLearn more about The Joe R. Engle Institute of Preaching at https://engle.ptsem.edu/.…
 
June 17, 2022 | The Joe R. Engle Institute of Preaching"No Weapon Formed; The Gospel According to Black Lives Matter"Speaker: Dr. Juan Floyd-Thomas, associate professor of African American religious history, Vanderbilt UniversityLearn more about The Joe R. Engle Institute of Preaching at https://engle.ptsem.edu/.…
 
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