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Comedian Rick Ramos sits down and talks current theatrical releases and offers suggestions for additional movie watching choices. A film fans dream come true, WatchThis is about the art, beauty, and possibilities of cinema. Each week Ramos discusses the greatest films ever made (including those that you may have missed) as well as the artists that have created these films. He also goes further in discussing how much these films mean to him and how much they will - hopefully - mean to you. Enjoy!
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show series
 
From Cute & Cuddly to Killer: Joe Dante's Gremlins and Gremlins 2: The New Batch This week Mr. Chavez & I continue our stroll through the 1980s with a look at a stange kind of Comedy/Puppetry/Action/Horror hybrid, Joe Dante's Gremlins (1984). Dante - a graduate of the Roger Corman School of Low-Budget Filmmaking - is one of the most criminally unde…
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What's Out There: Ridley Scott's Alien and John Carpenter's The Thing This week we take a look at two of the greatest Science-Fiction/Horror films in the History of Cinema: Ridley Scott's Alien (1979) and John Carpenter's The Thing (1982) We've talked about both of these films throughout the history of the podcast, however on this go-around we take…
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A Safe Alien for the Box Office: Steven Spielberg's E.T. The Extra Terrestrial This week Mr. Chavez & I shift our focus from the dangers of extra terrestrial life to the cute and cuddly alien that captivated audiences in 1982 - Steven Spielberg's E.T. The Extra Terrestrial. At the time, the biggest box office hit in the history of cinema (a title i…
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Paradise Lost - Ridley Scott's Alien: Covenant This week brings us to the end of our look into the Alien franchise with a discussion of Ridley Scott's final journey into the world he introduced audiences to in 1979. 2017's Alien: Covenant did a great deal to explain the origin of the xenomorphs and the space jockey, however an equal number of quest…
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F*cked Around and Found Out: Ridley Scott's Prometheus It's rare that a director can tell a story, go on to fabulous critical and commercial success, and return to his origins, answering questions that have hovered around a franchise for decades, while doing so in an exciting and innovative way. Ridley Scott's Alien introduced one of the great Scie…
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Dead on Arrival: John-Pierre Jeunet's Alien Resurrection Closing in on the end of the month brings us to the end of the original Alien franchise. 1997s Alien Resurrection is a ridiculous mess of a film that is a final disappointing period to one of the greatest Horror/Sci-Fi franchises in the history of cinema. From a script by Joss Whedon and dire…
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Dragon, Mother, Queen: Not David Fincher’s Alien 3 Continuing our descent into the world created in 1979's Alien and continued with 1986's Aliens, this week Mr. Chavez & I find ourselves crash landing on Fiorina "Fury" 161 - a foundry and maximum-security planet prison. David Fincher (in his feature directorial debut) takes the helm for 1992's Alie…
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Unfinished Business: James Cameron's Aliens This week Ibrahim & I return to LV-426. 57 years later - but feeling more like seven - James Cameron takes over the reins for the masterpiece created by Sir Ridley Scott. 1979's Alien would change the Sci-Fi genre. An incredibly influential work of cinema, the film would influence any number of directors,…
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Crew Expendable: Ridley Scott's Alien Might as well not screw around and start 2024 with a bang . . . This month Mr. Chavez and I dive into the world of Ellen Ripley and the Xenomorphs. At this point it's been nearly 45 years since we were first introduced to the crew of the Nostromo: Tom Skerritt, Veronica Cartwright, Harry Dean Stanton, Ian Holm,…
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L.A. After Midnight: Dan Gilroy's Nightcrawler Finishing December and starting 2024. (Sorry, we're a bit late getting this one out.) A continuation and closing out of Ibrahim Chavez's Los Angeles. We've talked James Ellroy, Charles Bukowski, Thom Andersen, and Paul Schrader's Los Angeles. This week we filter the darkest, most cynical, and bleakest …
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Bukowski's Drunken Streets: Marco Ferreri's Tales of Ordinary Madness Continuing our exploration of The City of Angels, Mr. Chavez & I dive into the great Los Angeles novelist, short story writer, poet, and "Dirty Old Man" Henry Charles Bukowski (1920 - 1994). Bukowski holds a special place in my heart and memories; Beginning with Notes of a Dirty …
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Down These Dark Streets: James Ellroy - Feast of Death Continuing our travels through Los Angeles, Mr. Chavez & I focus our discussion on the great LA Crime (Historical Crime) Novelist, James Ellroy. Famous for his LA Quartet - including The Black Dahlia, L.A. Confidential, The Big Nowhere, and White Jazz, as well as the autobiographical My Dark Pl…
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Another Lost Angel: Paul Schrader's Hardcore This week we continue our descent into Ibrahim Chavez's Los Angeles with a look at Taxi Driver screenwriter, Paul Schrader's blunt and brutal examination of the Los Angeles/San Diego/San Francisco sex trade of the late 1970s. Schrader's upbringing in a strict Calvinist environment would shape his social …
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At Night and From a Distance: Thom Andersen's Los Angeles Plays Itself We're starting the month of December (and ending 2023) with a dive into Los Angeles in a month of programming curated by our own Ibrahim Chavez. Our first episode of December is a look at film critic and teacher, Thom Andersen's "video essay" Los Angeles Plays Itself (2003). A l…
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Beyond Laughter: Richard Pryor - Live in Concert & Live on the Sunset Strip This week Mr. Chavez & I close out November with a look at - arguably - the greatest stand-up comic the craft has ever produced, Richard Franklin Lennox Thomas Pryor, Sr. I have been an admirer of Mr. Pryor for nearly five decades now and am unable to remember a time when I…
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Ransom: Akira Kurosawa's High & Low There are no shortage of names that define our undersrtanding and foster our enjoyment of Cinema. Scorsese, Fellini, Bergman, Leone, Eisenstein, Spielberg, Chaplin, Keaton, Lumet, Ford, Hawks . . . the list could run for pages (and fortunately for us it does). There is a name that cannot be left off . . . Best kn…
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When a Promise Meant Something: Sean Penn's The Pledge November is the month of Rick Ramos and this week we continue - following Martin Scorsese's Killers of the Flower Moon and Walter Hill's Hard Times - with a look at Sean Penn's 2001 The Pledge. Featuring an underrated (and I would argue tragically underseen) Jack Nicholson performance that side…
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Oil & Blood: Martin Scorsese's Killers of the Flower Moon Take a listen as Mr. Chavez & I kick off the month of November with a series of films curated by your host and producer, Rick Ramos. We begin with a discussion of Martin Scorsese's newest film - currently in theaters - Killers of the Flower Moon, a beautifully realized adaptation of David Gr…
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1933 . . . Words Didn't Buy Much - Walter Hill's Hard Times On this week's episode, Mr. Ramos celebrates his 49th birthday looking at the purpose and drive of WatchThis W/RickRamos, some of his favorite films, why he loves them as he does, and culminating with a look at one of his favorite films, Walter Hill's directorial debut, Hard Times (1975). …
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Your #1 Fan: Rob Reiner & Stephen King's Misery This week Mr. Chavez & I close out October and Halloween with one of the great Horror/Thrillers of the 1990s, Rob Reiner's adaptation of Stephen King's Misery. A tale of King's personal struggles with the writing medium, alcohol and drug abuse, and the perils of fame told through the life of the ficti…
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Never Sleep Again: The Horror of Freddy Krueger This week Ibrahim & i talk one of the iconic Horror figures of the late 20th Century, Wes Craven's pedophile, nightmare murderer Freddy Krueger. Through seven original films, a remake (which we only touch on), and a Friday the13th crossover, Krueger has taken on a cryptic and overwhelming cult of popu…
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Full Moon Fever: John Landis's An American Werewolf in London Halloween is around the corner . . . this week Mr. Chavez & I continue our look into the Horror Genre with a screening and discussion of John Landis's 1981 Horror Classic, An American Werewolf in London. There's a whole lot going on in Landis's film (some good, some bad, some exteme), bu…
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The Horror Double: Invasion of the Body Snatchers This week Ibrahim & I look at a classic (a standard) of the Horror Genre - Invasion of the Body Snatchers (1956 & 1978) and Body Snatchers (1993). Based on the 1954 Jack Finney Sci-Fi Novel, directors Don Siegel, Philip Kaufman, and Abel Ferrara have taken drastically different approaches to this ma…
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Bloody Giallo - Dario Argento's Suspiria This week Ibrahim & I dive into the world of Italian Giallo Cinema with a look at Dario Argento's 1977 "masterpiece" Suspiria. Combining violence, sexploitation, the supernatural, and vibrant color, Argento's film is one that is considered one of the most influential films in the genre. For those familiar wi…
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Dark, Wild Woods: Neil Jordan's The Company of Wolves This week Mr. Chavez & I sink into the world of Fairy Tales and Warped Childrens' Stories to examine Director Neil Jordan's 1984 Horror/Fairy Tale The Company of Wolves. This is an intersting film with beautiful production design. One of us appreciates it more than the other and so the arguments…
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Beyond Black Tropes: Horror Noire: A History of Black Horror (Part II) A second episode uploaded and ready for your enjoyment, as Mr. Chavez and Mr. Ramos continue our look at The History of Black Horror Cinema through the Shudder Network and Xavier Burgin's Horror Noire: A History of Black Horror (2019). Take a listen as we move out of the "Blaxpl…
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First to Die: Black Noire: A History of Black Horror (Part I) The first of a two-part looking at The History of Black Horror Cinema. On this episode we discuss the Shudder Network Documentary Black Noire: A History of Black Horror (2019), focusing on the history, films, tropes, and achievements of African-American Horror Cinema. Including interview…
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Horror Well-Cut: Nicholas Roeg's Don't Look Now This week Ibrahim & I continue our descent into Horror Cinema with a look at a British Classic, Nicholas Roeg's Don't Look Now (1973). Beautifully edited, masterfully directed, and sensitively acted (from stars Julie Christie and Donald Sutherland), Nicholas Roeg's film examines the struggle of a marr…
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A Mary Shelley Dick Joke: Mel Brooks's Young Frankenstein There's absolutely no caption, intro, blurb, or description that can capture the magic and brilliance of Mel Brooks's masterpiece (arguably one of three), Young Frankenstein (1974). From a script by Brooks and star, Gene Wilder, two comic geniuses salute, honor, and show great love for the C…
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Family Plot: William Friedkin's Film of Tracy Letts's Killer Joe This week Ibrahim & I remember the iconic filmmaker, William Friedkin. Friedkin was director of numerous classic films including: The French Connection (1971), The Exorcist (1973), Sorcerer (1977), and To LIve and Die in L.A. (1985). His career would see numerous hits and misses, howe…
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The Prometheus Warning: Christopher Nolan's Oppenheimer Take a listen as Mr. Chavez makes his triumphant return and we dive into Christopher Nolan's masterpiece bio-pic of J. Robert Oppenheimer - The Father of the Atomic Bomb. A fascinating film that the two of us are thrilled to have seen in 70MM IMAX and are even more thrilled to discuss. A great…
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Based On a True Story: William Friedkin's The Brink's Job This past week we said farewell to one of the greats of 70s & 80s Cinema, William Friedkin. Known for such classics as The French Connection, The Exorcist, and To Live and Die in L.A, Friedkin was a difficult and polarizing figure in the world of cinema. What cannot be argued was his brilian…
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Murder Comes Home - Carl Franklin's One False Move This week I take a look at Carl Franklin's 1992 directorial debut, the powerful and disturbing, One False Move. Featuring Bill Paxton, Billy Bob Thorton, Cynda Williams, Earl Billings, Jim Metzler, and Michael Beach, in a film the great film critic Roger Ebert called, "a powerful directing job. He …
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Taking Chances . . . Bitter Stories Neo-Noir - Walter Hill's Johnny Handsome A solo episode for your enjoyment. This week I recommend a classic Walter Hill film showcasing the violence, grittiness, and power of action and neo-noir cinema. Featuring an all-star cast including Forrest Whitaker, Ellen Barkin, Lance Henriksen, Elizabeth McGovern, Morga…
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A Continuing Story to Tell - The American Western: Dead for a Dollar & Old Henry Rick Ramos flies solo and talks Walter Hill's Dead for a Dollar (2022), featuring Christoph Waltz and Willem Defoe and Potsy Ponciroli's Old Henry (2021) starring Tim Blake Nelson, Steven Dorff, and Trace Adkins. One good film (if not somewhat disappointing) from one o…
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A Humanistic Pairing: Harrison Ford & Peter Weir (Witness and The Mosquito Coast) Join me as we close out our Harrison Ford Tribute (tribute?) with a look at two exceptional Ford performances (one of which is his only Oscar nomination), 1985s Witness and 1986s The Mosquito Coast. In the first film a seemingly typical Ford character, Philadelphia De…
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Indiana Jones: The Making of a Hero This week Ibrahim & I continue to look at the world of Indiana Jones, first profiled in Raiders of the Lost Ark (1981) and continued with Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom (1984), Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade (1989), Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull (2008), and Indiana Jones and Dial of…
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Indiana Jones: Raiders of the Lost Ark This week Mr. Chavez & I continue our look at one of the great cinematic heroes, The George Lucas/Steven Spielberg imagined, Harrison Ford realized Indiana Jones. For over forty years, five films (as well as novelizations, comic books, and a television show - which we will not be getting into) and countless ad…
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Yesterday Belongs to Us: Indiana Jones & The Dial of Destiny This week Mr. Chavez & I welcome the return of Henry Walton Jones, Jr. better known as "Indiana" Jones. Fifteen years since Kingdom of the Crystal Skull and 34 years since The Last Crusade, Jones (the 80 years old Harrison Ford) is back in - possibly - his greatest role. James Mangold (Wa…
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Hidden in the Mind: Ken Russell's Altered States This week Mr. Chavez and I continue our exploration of mind-altering narratives with a look at Ken Russell's 1980 Hollywood debut, Altered States. While not a completely successful film, there are elements here that force the audience to look deeper into the subject of sensory deprivation, isolation …
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The Suffering in Between: Adrian Lyne's Jacob's Ladder This week Ibrahim & I continue looking into the world of challenging and painful cinema. In 1990 Adrian Lyne directed Bruce Joel Rubin's screenplay (considered one of the great unfilmed screenplays for the ten years before the production) of Jacob's Ladder (Rubin would also write that year's Gh…
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Tokyo Book of the Dead: Gaspar Noé's Enter the Void This week Mr. Chavez and I examine the work of a controversial and polarizing director, Gaspar Noé. Noé made headlines in the early 2000s with Irreversible, a film that continues to upset audiences and challenges filmmaking conventions. With Enter the Void (2009), Noé doubled down and created a fi…
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A Little Girl's Dream: Terry Gilliam's Tideland Troubled throughout his career for circumstances - oftentimes - beyond his control (inadequate budgets - Munchausen, studio interference - Brazil and The Brothers Grimm, flash floods - Quixote, and death - Parnassus), Terry Gilliam has somehow been able to create some of the most incredible images eve…
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Anti-Sci-Fi: Andrei Tarkovsky's Solaris This week Ibrahim & I sit down to discuss a film widely-heralded as a masterpiece of Science Fiction Cinema, Andrei Tarkovsky's Solaris. In previous episodes, Ibrahim and I have discussed the brilliance of Tarkovsky's Mirror and Stalker. Here we struggle to understand and critique a film (widely recognized as…
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Way of Nature, Way of Grace: Terrence Malick's The Tree of Life One of the greatest films ever commited to celluloid . . . Terrence Malick's The Tree of Life. This is simply the greatest film about childhood; beautifully photographed, honestly acted, and briliantly realized, Malick is a true visionary whose five films up to this point (2011) are al…
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Donkey Variations: Jerzy Skolimowski's EO This week Mr. Chavez and I travel to Cinematic Poland for Jerzy Skolimowski's EO - a beautiful and touching examination of the world through a donkey's eyes. Pain, Suffering, Beauty, and Resilience inspired by Bresson's Au Hasard Balthazar, but with a modern vision. This is an inspired piece of cinema, one …
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Virtual Girl & Sad Boy: Spike Jonez's Her On this week's episode, Mr. Chavez & I sit down to discuss Spike Jonez's Her, a film particularly important and reflective of these times. With beautiful cinematography from Dutch/Swedish cinematographer, Hoyte van Hoytema, and featuring touching performances from Joaquin Phoenix, Amy Adams, Rooney Mara, an…
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Beast of Burden: Robert Bresson's Au Hasard Balthazar - WatchThis W/RickRamos This week finds Mr. Chavez and myself continuing our dive into films with great reputations and few viewings. Bresson's 1966 French Classic, Au Hasard Balthazar, looks at life through the eyes of a donkey as it moves through the world being loved, abused, championed, work…
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A New Kind of Forgotten Western - Sam Raimi's The Quick & the Dead This week Mr. Chavez continues to travel and I continue my exploration into the vast number of films that I've somehow missed in this lifetime. There are quite a few films on this list and this podcast allows me the opportunity to watch them and assess their value. This week's choic…
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Loser Row - David Mamet's American Buffalo This week I go it alone to ramble on about losers, warped friendships, bad ideas, and hopelessness in David Mamet's 1975 play to 1996 film adaptation, American Buffalo. A three man showcase for Dennis Franz (Donny), Dustin Hoffman (Teach), and Sean Nelson (Bobby) in an angry portrait of loses who have no i…
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