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La storia è fatta dagli uomini. Eppure le donne hanno contribuito allo stesso modo allo sviluppo storico, politico e culturale, seppur spesso dimenticate dai libri.Questo podcast è un piccolo omaggio alle loro vite.Ogni martedì, vi racconterò in meno di 10 minuti le loro storie, sperando che siano di ispirazione a molti all'ascolto.
 
Comedian Samantha Baines celebrates amazing women in history with awesome modern-day women and non-binary peeps. Each episode features incredible guests joining Sam to share their achievements and experiences and talk about the heroines that inspired them to succeed. From topics serious to silly, subscribe for your weekly, no holds-barred chat between awesome wo-men (which are the same as men, just with a little more 'wooo') every Thursday. Follow us on @periodspodcast Subscribe @acast And f ...
 
Join us on the digital airwaves with History Factory Plugged In, a biweekly podcast that takes a refreshing look at the rich and sometimes provocative heritage of major U.S. and global organizations. Host Jason Dressel, Managing Director at History Factory, and his guests explore current events and other topics related to business heritage. Company history comes alive in this engaging, thought-provoking show.
 
These oral history interviews, conducted by Georgina Ferry, capture the stories of pioneering women at the forefront of research, teaching and service provision for computing in Oxford, 1950s-1990s. Themes throughout the interviews include career opportunities, gender splits in computing, the origins and development of computing teaching and research in Oxford, as well as development of the University of Oxford's Computing Service and the commercial software house the Numerical Algorithms Gr ...
 
Each episode of Today in Canadian History contains an interview with a Canadian professor, journalist, author, or “everyday” historian and focuses on a unique event or moment that took place on that day in Canadian history. Today in Canadian History presents Canada’s past in a unique and accessible manner. The series is designed to be a first step to learning more about our past. We would like to remind Canadians not just about what makes our country great, but what makes it complicated, bea ...
 
"This Week in Black History, Society, and Culture" is a weekly podcast produced by the Black and African Diaspora Forum United (BADFU) an interracial group of faculty at Monmouth University concerned about issues pertaining to the Black/African American experience. BADFU members will periodically interview scholars, authors, activists, and community leaders on matters related to the history, society, and culture of Black and African American communities in the United States (U.S.) and beyond ...
 
Join us as we travel across England visiting well-known wonders and some lesser-known places on your doorstep – all of which have helped make the country what it is today. From a hut in Bletchley Park where modern computing evolved, to the iron railings in London to which suffragettes chained themselves in the fight for women’s right to vote, we’ll step back in time to the very roots of our national identity to bring you the people and the stories that have helped shape England. Irreplaceabl ...
 
We at the Field of 68 media network are thrilled to announce the launch of a new series called 68 Shining Moments. We’ve spent the last four months amassing interviews with the people that lived the greatest, the most memorable moments in the history of the NCAA tournament. They take you through their experiences, their memories and share the stories you've never heard before about the moments you'll never forget.
 
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Tanya L. Roth's Her Cold War: Women in the U.S. Military, 1945–1980 (University of North Carolina Press, 2021) explains that while Rosie the Riveter had fewer paid employment options after being told to cede her job to returning World War II veterans, her sisters and daughters found new work opportunities in national defense. The 1948 Women's Armed…
 
Join Julia and a very special guest Shaylo Ren! BUY MERCH: https://www.teepublic.com/user/unsobered-podcast Support the Podcast: www.patreon.com/unsoberedpod Follow the Guest: Twitter: @shaylo_ren TikTok: @shaylo_ren Follow the Podcast: Twitter: @unsoberedpod Instagram: @unsoberedpod Contact the Podcast: unsoberedpod@gmail.com Follow the host: Inst…
 
In this installment of our Recall this Buck series (check out our earlier conversations with Thomas Piketty, Peter Brown and Christine Desan), John and Elizabeth talk with Daniel Souleles, anthropologist at the Copenhagen Business School and author of Songs of Profit, Songs of Loss: Private Equity, Wealth, and Inequality (Lincoln : University of Ne…
 
Today we have a series of prank stories that aren’t quite substantial enough to be their own episodes. We’ve got a joke that became a living legend, a large-scale prank that created havoc, and a televised hoax that reminds us all of the importance of critical thinking. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com…
 
In the early twentieth century, when many US unions disgracefully excluded black and Asian workers, the Industrial Workers of the World (IWW) warmly welcomed people of color, in keeping with their emphasis on class solidarity and their bold motto: "An Injury to One Is an Injury to All!" A brilliant union organizer and a humorous orator, Benjamin Fl…
 
In this episode, Hettie V. Williams is in discussion with Dr. Anwar Uhuru and Dr. Zaneta Rago-Craft about Nella Larsen’s Passing in literature and on film. Williams is an Associate Professor of African American history in the Department of History at Monmouth University. Dr. Uhuru is an Associate Professor of African American literature at Monmouth…
 
Abram Van Engen of Washington University in St. Louis taught a class about how the Pilgrims became part of the United States' founding story in 19th-century history textbooks. He described why early historians and educators emphasized the Pilgrims' Plymouth Colony over earlier settlements, such as Jamestown in Virginia. Learn more about your ad cho…
 
This 2013 episode covers the taxidermist Potter, who had preserved and mounted 98 birds by the time he was 19. In 1880, his work had grown to a point where it had to be moved to a building, which became his museum. Potter's museum collection continues to enthrall collectors and enthusiasts. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodc…
 
“The Europeans raise all the cattle, but the Chinese get all the milk.” This joke, told in colonial Singapore, was indicative of the importance of the Chinese diaspora throughout Southeast Asia. Chinese migrants were miners, laborers, merchants and traders: the foundation of many colonial cities throughout Asia--while also making sure that their ow…
 
"History Factory Plugged In” is back with a special Thanksgiving episode featuring Nicole Johnson, director of Butterball's Turkey Talk-Line, and Rebecca Welch, senior brand manager at Butterball. With host Jason Dressel, they discuss 40 years of the Turkey Talk-Line and reminisce about some of their favorite Thanksgiving inquiries.Company history …
 
In this episode, Hettie V. Williams is in discussion with Dr. Noliwe Rooks on a range of subjects. Williams is an Associate Professor at Monmouth University and Rooks is Chair and Professor in the Africana Studies Department at Brown University. She is an interdisciplinary school and her work examines how race and gender impact and are impacted by …
 
In Asphalt: A History (U Nebraska Press, 2021), Kenneth O’Reilly provides a history of this everyday substance. By tracing the history of asphalt—in both its natural and processed forms—from ancient times to the present, O’Reilly sets out to identify its importance within various contexts of human society and culture. Although O’Reilly argues that …
 
American University professor Pamela Nadell taught a class about the rise in anti-Semitism in America between World War I and II. She described the 1915 lynching of Jewish man Leo Frank in Georgia, how international anti-Semitic texts made their way to America, and the role Henry Ford played in spreading anti-Jewish sentiments. Learn more about you…
 
This 2014 episode covers how pigments and dyes have historically come from all manner of animals, vegetables and minerals. From ochre to cochineal red to the rarest of purples, color has been an important part of human life for centuries. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com…
 
The avocado is the iconic food of the twenty-first century. It has gone from a little-known regional food to a social media darling in less than a hundred years. This is an astounding trajectory for a fruit that isn’t sweet, becomes bitter when it is cooked and has perhaps the oddest texture of any fruit or vegetable. But the idea that this rich an…
 
Tarbell saw her family and community clash with Standard Oil when she was growing up. This second part covers her work for McClure’s Magazine and the most important journalistic work of her life – “The History of the Standard Oil Company.” Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com…
 
Ümit Kurt, born and raised in Gaziantep, Turkey, was astonished to learn that his hometown once had a large and active Armenian community. The Armenian presence in Aintab, the city’s name during the Ottoman period, had not only been destroyed―it had been replaced. To every appearance, Gaziantep was a typical Turkish city. Kurt digs into the details…
 
Judith Shapiro and John-Andrew McNeish's book Our Extractive Age: Expressions of Violence and Resistance (Routledge, 2021) emphasizes how the spectrum of violence associated with natural resource extraction permeates contemporary collective life. Chronicling the increasing rates of brutal suppression of local environmental and labor activists in ru…
 
Ida Tarbell was one of the first investigative journalists, and the biggest work of her life involved exposing exploitive and illegal business practices at Standard Oil. Part one covers her early life, which led her to that story. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com…
 
In the ten episodes of Season 1 hear secretly recorded conversations President Lyndon Johnson made on topics including the Warren Commission, the Vietnam War, the March on Selma, and more. Find it wherever you listen to podcasts starting 11/22 and follow it today so you never miss an episode. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adc…
 
Today I talked to Rosa Abreu-Runkel about her new book Vanilla: A Global History (Reaktion Books, 2020). Intoxicating and evocative, vanilla is so much more than a spice rack staple. It is a flavor that has defined the entire world—and its roots reach deep into the past. With its earliest origins dating back seventy million years, the history of va…
 
When Prince Pedro of Portugal was married off in the 1300s, he only had eyes for his new wife's lady in waiting. This 2017 episode about the relationship between Inês and Pedro has everything: romance, deception, murder, and a corpse crowned as queen. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com…
 
Tracy and Holly discuss the possible inspiration for Maggie Lena Walker's name, and then discuss favorite recipes as inspired by a listener mail. They also speculate on Pepper's personality, and how he opened up education to a wide audience. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com…
 
From beer labels to literary classics like A River Runs Through It, trout fishing is a beloved feature of the iconography of the American West. But as Jen Brown demonstrates in Trout Culture: How Fly Fishing Forever Changed the Rocky Mountain West (U Washington Press, 2017), the popular conception of Rocky Mountain trout fishing as a quintessential…
 
Mexico City's public markets were integral to the country's economic development, bolstering the expansion of capitalism from the mid-nineteenth to mid-twentieth centuries. These publicly owned and operated markets supplied households with everyday necessities and generated revenue for local authorities. At the same time, they were embedded in a wi…
 
“History Factory Plugged In” is back with a new season, kicking off with an interview with Stephen J.A. Ward, Ph.D., author, professor and internationally recognized media ethicist. In the wake of various scandals and a name change from the company formerly known as Facebook, we discuss the current media landscape, how we got here and his prescript…
 
Tokyo Boogie-Woogie: Japan's Pop Era and its Discontents (Harvard University Press, 2017) by Hiromu Nagahara is the first English-language history of the origins and impact of the Japanese pop music industry. The book connects the rise of mass entertainment, epitomized by ryūkōka (“popular songs”), with Japan’s transformation into a middle-class so…
 
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