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The Graduate Center of The City University of New York (CUNY) is a leader in public graduate education devoted to enhancing the public good through pioneering research, serious learning, and reasoned debate. The Graduate Center offers ambitious students more than 40 doctoral and master’s programs of the highest caliber, taught by top faculty from throughout CUNY — the nation’s largest public urban university. Through its nearly 40 centers, institutes, and initiatives, including its Advanced ...
 
Conversations in the Digital Age with Jim Zirin is a talk show designed to illuminate the news by taking the time required to understand and interpret national and world events. The series features high-profile guests from the worlds of politics, law, business, foreign relations, national security, counterterrorism, media, lifestyles, literature, the arts, and the military. The series is hosted by Jim Zirin, a leading litigator and contributor to major publications including Forbes, the Dail ...
 
City Talk is CUNY TV 's forum for politics and public affairs. City Talk presents lively discussion of New York City issues, with the people that help make this city function. City Talk is hosted by Professor Doug Muzzio, political commentator for WABC-TV New York, co-director of the Center for the Study of Leadership in Government and the founder and former director of the Baruch College Survey Research Unit, both at Baruch College's School of Public Affairs.
 
Brian Lehrer, of WNYC Radio's Brian Lehrer Show, also hosts an hour-long weekly television show on CUNY-TV. In addition to highlighting new academic research with the power to transform society and policy in a regular segment called, "Public Intellectual," Brian interviews experts on a wide variety of topics including: the digital age and how it’s transforming our world; new social and political trends and current events in New York City and beyond; entrepreneurs of change; grassroots enviro ...
 
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show series
 
Beginning in 1990, thousands of Spanish speakers emigrated to Japan. A Cultural History of Spanish Speakers in Japan focuses on the intellectuals, literature, translations, festivals, cultural associations, music (bolero, tropical music, and pop, including reggaeton), dance (flamenco, tango and salsa), radio, newspapers, magazines, libraries, and b…
 
Ash Marinaccio is a multidisciplinary and award-winning documentarian working in theater, film, and photography. She is dedicated to storytelling that highlights the socio-political issues defining our times and is particularly invested in telling queer and working-class stories. She is currently a Ph.D. candidate in the Theatre and Performance pro…
 
An industry deeply affected by Covid-19 is hospitality. Banks and clients explore ways to stay in business: converting to rentals and office space, creating private dining rooms; landlords have been supportive of restaurants; ghost-kitchens, take-out, pop-ups are doing well. Leisure travel and personal events are expected to return sooner then busi…
 
Bob talks with guest Eliza Sweren-Becker, counsel to the democracy program at the Brennan Center for Justice at NYU Law School, about the attempts that the Republican Party is making to undermine the voting rights of millions of Americans – and especially black Americans, and what can be done to stop them.…
 
The impact of the pandemic on the Asian-American community in New York City is particularly profound. Beyond the pandemics effect on public health, economic growth, education, medical services, food supply, and international relations, the Asian-American community has been blamed for the pandemic and the target of hate and violence. Co-executive ed…
 
The Community Sensor Lab at the Advanced Science Research Center at The Graduate Center, CUNY (CUNY ASRC) aims to give New Yorkers living in marginalized communities, who are the most vulnerable to the effects of climate change and to air, water, and soil pollution, the ability to monitor their environment and use the data that they collect to advo…
 
This study by Dr. Sujung Kim interrogates working-class Korean immigrant students sense of social belonging and their strategies to advocate their social membership, focusing on working-class 1.5 generation Korean American students at Station Community College (SCC), a public community college in Chicago.…
 
Discussing various real estate asset classes a year into the pandemic, guests see hopeful signs of increased activity in the multi-family market and, product-by-product, in industrial space and the office market. Employees returning to offices would be most beneficial. Retail, luxury condos, and hotels may continue to be challenged but it's a time …
 
From the transistors in the iPhone 12 to coronavirus vaccines, nanotechnology surrounds us. In this episode of The Thought Project podcast, Graduate Center Professor Rein Ulijn describes the current and potential impact of nanoscience, or the study of structures and materials at the nanometer scale (one millionth of a millimeter, the scale of atoms…
 
Uncertain describes today's office market. A 15% occupancy, coupled with a year-long work-at-home tenant has led to a soft office market. Guests expect tenants to carefully re-evaluate space needs. The Garment Center shows a small come back, PPP is helpful, but "C" & "D" office buildings and small tenants have difficulty getting financing. Co-worki…
 
Heath Brown is an associate professor of public policy and criminal justice at John Jay College and The Graduate Center, CUNY. He studies policy process, interest groups, presidential transitions, and education policy. He is the author of five books, including Homeschooling the Right: How Conservative Education Activism Erodes the State, which was …
 
Discussing retail, guests are reasonably optimistic, noting "We're doing business!" In response to the pandemic, drug stores, supermarkets are doing well; restaurants are coming back with the vaccine, eased restrictions and government assistance. While the future of small businesses is not secure, retailers are hopeful that consumer's pent-up deman…
 
This presentation focuses on the writings and performances of Dr. Anandibai Joshee, who graduated from the Womans Medical College of Pennsylvania in 1886 and became the first Indian woman to gain a degree in medicine. Param Ajmera investigates how Anandibai used the influence provided by her university to develop relationships with the American fem…
 
Many historians and Japanese Americans cite the loss of U.S. citizenship rights as the biggest injustice of the camps, and many believe cooperation and not resistance was the norm. Join Dr. Gary Okihiro as he outlines the nature of the oppression in that historical experience, and the resistance posed to those oppressive acts.…
 
In her book, We the Women: The Unstoppable Mothers of the Equal Rights Amendment, legal scholar Julie Suk tells the story of the ERA through the voices of the bold women lawmakers who created it. Facing opposition and subterfuge at every turn, they kept the ERA alive. And, despite significant victories by women lawyers like Ruth Bader Ginsburg, the…
 
Banks with significant liquidity look to lend to successful condos, rental projects and assisted living developments on Long Island. LI residential markets are robust, as the local population can successfully sell their homes, many to New York City residents, anxious to leave the city. Guests discuss the office market, retail and hospitality, areas…
 
Brooklyn College alumnus Robert Jones Jr.'s debut novel, "The Prophets," is a different kind of love story: It reaches across centuries, continents and cultures to tell a soulful story of love between two young homosexual men enslaved on a plantation in the antebellum American South.由Book Beat – CUNY Podcasts
 
Nobel laureate Paul Krugman is a distinguished professor of economics at The Graduate Center, CUNY, a faculty member at the Stone Center on Socio-Economic Inequality, and a New York Times columnist. He writes frequently about U.S. politics, economics, and economic and social policy. Lately, he has been sharing his opinions about Bidenomics(mostly g…
 
As we emerge, hopefully, from this COVID-19 pandemic, New York is heading straight into a housing crisis. At some point the moratoriums on evictions and foreclosures will be lifted, and an awful lot of New Yorkers will not have the money to pay their back rent, or their mortgage arrears. What will this mean – not just for tenants, homeowners and la…
 
Attorneys, specializing in real estate and in general practice, discuss current issues affecting clients: rent relief, the importance of government PPP programs, and working remotely. Guests site future real estate opportunities in malls, big box spaces, retail; in foreign markets and foreign investors and in transactions in the hospitality industr…
 
Beyond soccer leagues, music camps, and drama lessons, todays youth are in an education arms race that begins in elementary school. In Hyper Education, Prof. Pawan Dhingra uncovers the growing world of high-achievement education and the after-school learning centers, spelling bees, and math competitions that it has spawned.…
 
Michael Javen Fortner is an assistant professor of political science at The Graduate Center, CUNY and a senior fellow at the Niskanen Center in Washington, D.C. He is the author of Black Silent Majority: The Rockefeller Drug Laws and the Politics of Punishment, and he recently published a policy paper, “Reconstructing Justice: Race, Generational Di…
 
The hospitality and tourism industries, historically contributors to New York City's economy, came to an almost complete halt in early 2020. Guests discuss how they are adapting, making changes, the vaccine, confident that these businesses will come back better than ever. Clients applaud landlords and banks for working with them; banks praise PPP, …
 
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